Tuesday, 30 October 2018

Routing Information Protocol (RIP)



Routing Information Protocol (RIP)

Routing information protocol (RIP) is a true distance-vector routing protocol. RIP sends the complete routing table out of all active interfaces every 30 seconds. It relies on hop count to determine the best route to a remote network, but it has a maximum 15 by default, so a destination of 16 would be considered unreachable. RIP works well in very small networks, but it’s not good at large networks with WAN links or on networks with a large numbers of routers installed and 
completely useless on networks have links with variable bandwidth.

RIP version 1 uses only classful routing, its means all devices in the network must use the same subnet mask, this is because RIP version 1 doesn’t send updates with subnet mask information in tow.
RIP version 2 provides something called prefix routing and does send subnet mask information with its route update. This is called classless routing.

In short

Routing Information Protocol version 1

·         Open standard protocol
·         Classful routing protocol
·         Updates are broadcast via 255.255.255.255
·         Administrative distance is 120
·         Metric: Hop counts, maximum Hop counts: 15  
·         Load balancing of 4 equal paths
·         Used for small organizations
·         Periodic updates and exchange entire routing table for every 30 seconds

Routing Information Protocol version 2

·         Classless routing protocol
·         Support VLSM
·         Supports authentication
Advantage of RIP
·         Easy to configure
·         No design constraints like OSPF protocol
·         No complexity
·         Less overhead
Disadvantage of RIP
·         Bandwidth utilization is very high as broadcast foe every 30 seconds
·         Works only on hop count
·         Not scalable as hop count is only 15
·         Slow convergence


Configuring RIPv2


Topology 

GOAL:

  • design the topology and assign ip addresses as per our diagram
  • make sure that the interface should be in UP  state.
  • configuring dynamic RIPv2. 
  • verify routing table and reachability LAN between LUKE, MARK, and JOHN. by doing ping and traceroute.   
LUKE#show ip interface brief
Interface              IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol

Serial3/0              10.1.1.1           YES manual up                    up
Loopback0      192.168.100.50   YES manual up                    up

MARK#show ip interface brief
Interface              IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol

Serial3/0              10.1.1.2        YES manual up                    up
Serial3/1              11.1.1.2        YES manual up                    up
Loopback0              192.168.150.75  YES manual up                    up

JOHN#show ip interface brief
Interface              IP-Address           OK? Method Status                Protocol
Serial3/1              11.1.1.1                    YES manual up                     up
Loopback0              192.168.200.100    YES manual up                    up


LUKE(config)#router rip
LUKE(config-router)#version 2
LUKE(config-router)#network 10.0.0.0
LUKE(config-router)#network 192.168.100.0

MARK(config)#router rip
MARK(config-router)#version 2
MARK(config-router)#network 10.0.0.0
MARK(config-router)#network 192.168.150.0
MARK(config-router)#network 11.0.0.0

JOHN(config)#router rip
JOHN(config-router)#version 2
JOHN(config-router)#network 192.168.200.0
JOHN(config-router)#network 11.0.0.0


LUKE#show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
       ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
       o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
       + - replicated route, % - next hop override

Gateway of last resort is not set

      10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        10.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Serial3/0
L        10.1.1.1/32 is directly connected, Serial3/0
R     11.0.0.0/8 [120/1] via 10.1.1.2, 00:00:09, Serial3/0
      192.168.100.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        192.168.100.0/24 is directly connected, Loopback0
L        192.168.100.50/32 is directly connected, Loopback0
R     192.168.150.0/24 [120/1] via 10.1.1.2, 00:00:09, Serial3/0
R     192.168.200.0/24 [120/2] via 10.1.1.2, 00:00:09, Serial3/0

MARK#show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
       ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
       o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
       + - replicated route, % - next hop override

Gateway of last resort is not set

      10.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        10.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Serial3/0
L        10.1.1.2/32 is directly connected, Serial3/0
      11.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        11.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Serial3/1
L        11.1.1.2/32 is directly connected, Serial3/1
R     192.168.100.0/24 [120/1] via 10.1.1.1, 00:00:19, Serial3/0
      192.168.150.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        192.168.150.0/24 is directly connected, Loopback0
L        192.168.150.75/32 is directly connected, Loopback0
R     192.168.200.0/24 [120/1] via 11.1.1.1, 00:00:25, Serial3/1


JOHN#show ip route
Codes: L - local, C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
       ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
       o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route, H - NHRP, l - LISP
       + - replicated route, % - next hop override

Gateway of last resort is not set

R     10.0.0.0/8 [120/1] via 11.1.1.2, 00:00:05, Serial3/1
      11.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        11.0.0.0/8 is directly connected, Serial3/1
L        11.1.1.1/32 is directly connected, Serial3/1
R     192.168.100.0/24 [120/2] via 11.1.1.2, 00:00:05, Serial3/1
R     192.168.150.0/24 [120/1] via 11.1.1.2, 00:00:05, Serial3/1
      192.168.200.0/24 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks
C        192.168.200.0/24 is directly connected, Loopback0
L        192.168.200.100/32 is directly connected, Loopback0



LUKE#ping 192.168.200.100
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.200.100, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 36/42/48 ms

LUKE#ping 192.168.150.75
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.150.75, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 16/18/20 ms

LUKE#ping 11.1.1.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 11.1.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 40/42/44 ms


MARK#ping 192.168.100.50
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.100.50, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 8/16/24 ms

MARK#ping 192.168.200.100
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.200.100, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 8/14/20 ms



JOHN#ping 192.168.100.50
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.100.50, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 40/44/48 ms

JOHN#ping 192.168.150.75
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.150.75, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 20/22/28 ms

JOHN#ping 10.1.1.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.1.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 20/30/40 ms



LUKE#traceroute 192.168.200.100
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 192.168.200.100
VRF info: (vrf in name/id, vrf out name/id)
  1 10.1.1.2 28 msec 24 msec 32 msec
  2 11.1.1.1 36 msec 64 msec 48 msec

LUKE#traceroute 192.168.150.75
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 192.168.150.75
VRF info: (vrf in name/id, vrf out name/id)
  1 10.1.1.2 16 msec 20 msec 28 msec
LUKE#traceroute 11.1.1.1

Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 11.1.1.1
VRF info: (vrf in name/id, vrf out name/id)
  1 10.1.1.2 20 msec 16 msec 8 msec
  2 11.1.1.1 32 msec 36 msec 32 msec

MARK#traceroute 192.168.100.50
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 192.168.100.50
VRF info: (vrf in name/id, vrf out name/id)
  1 10.1.1.1 24 msec 12 msec 28 msec

MARK#traceroute 192.168.200.100
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 192.168.200.100
VRF info: (vrf in name/id, vrf out name/id)
  1 11.1.1.1 24 msec 44 msec 20 msec


JOHN#traceroute 192.168.100.50
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 192.168.100.50
VRF info: (vrf in name/id, vrf out name/id)
  1 11.1.1.2 12 msec 12 msec 12 msec
  2 10.1.1.1 48 msec 32 msec 40 msec

JOHN#traceroute 192.168.150.75
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 192.168.150.75
VRF info: (vrf in name/id, vrf out name/id)
  1 11.1.1.2 16 msec 20 msec 8 msec

JOHN#traceroute 10.1.1.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 10.1.1.1
VRF info: (vrf in name/id, vrf out name/id)
  1 11.1.1.2 20 msec 20 msec 20 msec
  2 10.1.1.1 28 msec 32 msec 28 msec






 






























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